McLeansboro Times-Leader

Features

October 30, 2013

Paint like a professional with DIY simplicity

(BPT) — Think your favorite room is due for a new paint color?

To get a result that looks like it was plucked straight from a home improvement magazine, you don’t have to hire an interior designer or professional painter. You can do-it-yourself with a few tricks of the trade.

Choose the right color

Even a perfectly painted room is a failure if you are unhappy with the color. With thousands of designer-inspired palettes on the market, it’s easy for homeowners to get confused when it comes to selecting the right hue.

Some homeowners try taping color chips together to view their colors while others will paint a sample directly on the wall. While putting actual paint on the wall is considered the truest representation of color, no one wants to live with a wall marred with a patchwork of several different paint samples for very long.

Use high-quality paint tools and supplies

Start with a premium paint which can save you money in the long run. High-quality paint covers better, provides a richer hue and tends to be more durable.

Next, select a quality applicator. There’s a reason you don’t find professional painters using a dollar brush or roller — they don’t provide the best results and can sometimes make the job more difficult.

To ease your DIY task and ensure a professional outcome, choose premium tools that allow you to paint spaces much quicker and for even coverage. It is well worth the investment.

If you currently have a dark-colored room or a pattern on your walls, priming is a good idea. A good primer will transform your walls into a blank canvas so the new paint color can adhere properly and the true hue will be represented once it dries.

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